7 Ways To Foster Your Emotional Intelligence

According to Emotional Intelligence (EI) expert and author Harvey Deutschendorf, “the realization that E.I. has become an important predictor of job success, even surpassing technical ability, has been growing over the past number of years”.

Companies are placing a high value on E.I. in new hires for many important reasons. People with high E.I. understand and cooperate with others, they are exceptional listeners, open to feedback, have more empathy, and make thoughtful and thorough decisions.

In work, we all regret a time when we have all reacted too quickly to a situation or person and not given ourselves enough time to breathe, think and work out the best possible response. The good news is that we can all work on our level of EI – we can all become more emotionally intelligent and less volatile in the workplace (and in life generally)

Here are a few simple tricks to help you on your way

1.   Pause. Acknowledge your thoughts and feelings. Clear your mind.

After pausing and acknowledging your emotions, your mind will already feel much clearer. Nehad Tadros

2.   Breathe

Set aside two minutes – relax and breathe deeply. Then write down a couple of potential solutions to your problem.

3.   Focus on what you can change

When you hit a setback, separate the parts of the situation you can control or influence from the parts you cannot. Focus on what you can influence, and notice how much more confident you feel about overcoming the setback. Dawn Cook

4.   Be Friendly and open and smile

Chat to people, smile, ask them how they are and listen to the answer. Be naturally engaged.

5.   Find something impossible to do and practice it

It sounds corny, but it’s a profound mental switch. Just try saying, “I can’t,” and then “I can’t yet” – the emotional experience is dramatically different. The first is a wall. The second, a door. Joshua Freedman

6.   Be Open and Honest

Create opportunities to informally share what you feel and ask for feedback. This may seem daunting at first particularly if you are naturally reserved person but with practice is will become more natural and hopefully put you in a happier and more relaxed space.

7.   Be self-aware

I think it is very important to be able to acknowledge the areas in which you are weak and not be scared to verbalise it. You would be surprised how happy people are to give you a dig out and assist when you ask.

From time to time, I forget to follow my own best advice and go onto regret it later. However, the good news is that I really want to and enjoy trying to improve upon my skills in the whole area of EI. Realistically, it is always going to be a work in progress for me but hey-ho honesty is always the best policy!

Looking forward to hearing your thoughts on ways you too can foster emotional intelligence!

Tanya